Our Fire Engines

Commer Superpoise 4×4 Bikini Water Unit SXF509

Commer Superpoise 4x4 Bikini Water Unit SXF509
it was stationed in leicester for many years when the AFS became self contained mobile units prepared for action during the cold war. The unit carries 3 inflatable self propelled rafts and 9 light weight portable pumps and was designed to launch the rafts to carry men and equipment over water or pump from waterborne position. It is beleived that it is 1 of only 3 fully equiped bikinis left. The people of leicester and the leic mercury rasied funds for LCFBM to bring it back home, unfortunatly due to lack of storage the national fire museum ended up storing it for us, 12 years on and a batttle of solicitors its back were it belongs.

Dennis F38 Pump Escape.1963

Dennis F38 Pump Escape.1963
This appliance was one of two F38’s ordered by Leicester City Fire Brigade, known as No6 and No7 The F38’s ordered were built to the City Fire Brigades requirements. The body style of the Semi-Limousine type constructed with rear facing crew seats. The engine is a Rolls Royce B61, straight 6 petrol. The F38 has a narrow track of 12’6” and carried an angled 400 gallon water tank. Leicester ordered that their F38 should carry detachable escape mountings and a 35ft Morris Ajax ladder. No6 started service at Western station (New Parks) before being transferred to Central station (Lancaster road) serving along side the turntable ladder TL9 No7 the sister machine caught fire on Groby road (A50) in 1977 whilst on route to a fire call and was completely destroyed. No6 was retired in1979 and purchased by the society, however, the engine was severely damaged. After locating the engine from No7 it was overhauled and fitted into No6

Dennis Magirus Turntable Ladder

Dennis Magirus Turntable Ladder
This particular appliance was built to the requirements of the Leicester City Fire Brigade. The basic chassis cab fitted with Rolls Royce B81 Mark 5 engine was constructed by Dennis. The coachwork and fitting of the Magirus Ladder was completed by David Haydon Limited of Birmingham. The total cost of the appliance and equipment was £11,175. From 1962 to 1974 this appliance provided specialist aerial cover from Lancaster Road Fire Station (Central) for the Leicester City Fire Brigade and when requested attended incidents for the Leicestershire and Rutland Fire Service. Following the fire service reorganisation in 1974 the appliance served with the Leicestershire Fire Service continuing its duty at Central Station until being withdrawn from service in October 1986 700EJF remained with Leicestershire Fire Service as a reserve appliance, until April 1987 when Leicestershire fire and rescue service and the public protection committee donated the appliance to the society.

Coventry Climax FSM Trailer Pump

Coventry Climax FSM Trailer Pump
The Coventry climax FSM series were built in large quantities during wartime, for the home office. This model had the number D9357 originally, and would have been painted in home office grey. After the war it was bought by Bostick Limited and painted red. The FSM pump has a 4 cylinder petrol engine of 847cc capable of developing 23 bhp at 3,500 rpm. It is able to deliver 220 gallons per minute and can deliver a maximum pressure of 129 psi from its centrifugal pump priming of the pump is achieved by exhaust ejection.

Dorman Merryweather Hatfield Pump

Dorman Merryweather Hatfield Pump
This Merryweather appliance was owned by a local factory and served the works Fire Brigade for many years until its retirement, the companies name was Bostick limited. Bostick then donated this appliance to the society, it is believed to be 1 of only a limited number of surviving examples. This appliance has a Dorman engine which powers a reciprocating pump, delivering a positive water pressure in excess of 200 p.s.i.

1956 Bedford RLHZ “Green Goddess”

1956 Bedford RLHZ “Green Goddess”
These appliances were built to Home office specifications for major emergency use by the Auxiliary Fire Service, and stationed at various locations across the country. This appliance is the 4 wheel drive version intended for cross country work. Because of the extra un-laden weight these vehicles were only fitted with a 300 gallon first aid tank, and a main single stage Sigmund pump at the rear capable of delivering 1000 gallons of water per minute via 4 outlets. PGW 310 has a coach built body that was constructed at the former Willowbrook factory in Loughborough. It also served in Leicester during the Fire personnel strike in 1977, where it suffered major damage to its front. The society purchased it as scrap, but subsequently rebuilt it to its former glory. It is believed to have been the 1st 4x4 Green Goddess privately owned.

1951 Dennis F12 Pump Escape

1951 Dennis F12 Pump Escape
In 1951 the Ministry of works supplies division purchased two appliances, one for Eastbourne and one for Herefordshire. Both built with Semi Limousine bodies and Rolls Royce B80 straight eight engines. They have 400 gallon tanks and 2 pumps, a first aid pump of 100 gallons per minute and a main pump capable of delivering 400 gallons per minute. This vehicle is the one brought for Eastbourne fire brigade where it served as the front line appliance. It was retired in 1975, and was purchased privately for renovation. In 1989 it was donated to the society and under went more renovation work, it is now a favourite at shows and for weddings and is still referred to as No1

1939 Austin K2 Auxiliary towing vehicle

1939 Austin K2 Auxiliary towing vehicle
During the 2nd world war the home office ordered these utility vehicles, which formed the mainstay of the National fire service. They were ideal for towing trailer pumps and carrying crews and equipment. This particular vehicle saw active duty with the N.F.S during the Coventry blitz. It was then transferred after the war to Burton-upon-Trent fire brigade. Where it was fitted with a 100 gallon tank, hose reel, pump and was repainted in red. GXA 520 served in Burton-upon-Trent until 1972, it was regularly used for chimney fires and became affectingly known as the “chimney machine”.